Egypt Through the Glass Shop — Trailer

source:   fox13now.com, egyptglassshop.com, youtube.com

added: Tue, Jan 22nd '13

So, what do you do if your film wasn't selected for Sundance? Well, if you're anything like the filmmaker behind the indie documentary "Egypt Through the Glass Shop," you don't let a little rejection stop you. Just simply hop on a camel (that's right, a camel!), slowly hoof it down the streets of Park City, and promote your movie in the weirdest grassroots operation ever. That's exactly what indie director "Next" Anyextee did last Friday as he made a nutty effort to spread the word about his Sundance-rejected film, which tells the story of the Egyptian Revolution through the eyes of a young American glass-blower, who at the time was trying to establish a small glass shop.

As you might have expected, the publicity stunt grabbed a whole lot of attention, especially from a bunch of angry car travelers trying to pass. The stunt ultimately landed the ambitious director with a traffic citation. And while he was lucky enough to get away with a simple warning, his documentary definitely earned the award for most talked about film that wasn't a part of Sundance's line-up.

Go ahead and check out the film's trailer, posted above. And if you want more information on the movie (or check out some photos of the infamous camel ride) surf over to the film's official Facebook page.

synopsis:
A young entrepreneur and talented glass blower who set up a shop in Cairo and provides an update to the original method of glass blowing. Before long, he finds himself trapped in the country during the civil unrest that sparked the Arab Spring. The shop quickly falls into disarray and the glass blower finds himself displaced from the enterprise. A year later, he returns to reclaim his life's work. This film is a first hand account of the Egyptian Revolution through the eyes of a young American glass-blower.

 

directed by   "Next" Anyextee

starring   Benjamin "Tsunami" Lucas

release date   2013

 
blog comments powered by Disqus