November — U.S. Trailer

source:   november.oscilloscope.net

added: Fri, Feb 2nd '18

Need a weird-ass foreign film to help widen the scope of your cinematic cravings? Well, this might do the trick!

Check out the U.S. trailer for "November," an Estonian (yup, that's right, Estonian) fantasy-drama that features some rather striking black-and-white cinematography as it draws on 19th century Eastern European folklore and Pagan and Christian mythologies to tell a Grimm-like fairy tale about the perils of unrequited love and the disastrous consequences of performing black magic.

Based on the best-selling 2000 novel by Estonian author Andrus Kivirahk, the film, which earned strong notices last year at the Tribeca Film Festival, where cinematographer Mart Taniel took home the Best Cinematography award, is the latest feature from Estonian auteur Rainer Sarnet.

Starring Rea Lest, Jorgen Liik, Arvo Kukumagi, Katariina Unt, and Taavi Eelmaa, "November" will be making its way to the States later this month, opening first in New York City on February 23rd before arriving in Los Angeles on March 3rd and expanding to additional cities throughout the month of March.

synopsis:
In this tale of love and survival in 19th century Estonia, peasant girl Liina longs for village boy Hans, but Hans is inexplicably infatuated by the visiting German baroness that possesses all that he longs for. For Liina, winning Hans' requited love proves incredibly complicated in this dark, harsh landscape where spirits, werewolves, plagues, and the devil himself converge, where thievery is rampant, and where souls are highly regarded, but come quite cheap. With alluring black and white cinematography, Rainer Sarnet vividly captures these motley lives as they toil to exist -- is existence worth anything if it lacks a soul?

 

directed by   Rainer Sarnet

starring   Rea Lest, Jorgen Liik, Arvo Kukumagi, Katariina Unt, and Taavi Eelmaa

release date   February 23, 2018 (in NY), March 3, 2018 (in LA, other cities to follow)

 
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